Role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in context-dependent motor performance.




Curated By TMS Solutions on Jan 19, 2017 9:16:00 AM
Curated By TMS Solutions
 Title:
Role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in context-dependent motor performance.
Authors:
Lee YY; Winstein CJ; Fisher BE. Institution Lee, Y-Y. Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA. Lee, Y-Y. School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. Winstein, C J. Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA. Fisher, B E. Division of Biokinesiology and Physical Therapy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA. Fisher, B E. Department of Neurology, Division for Movement Disorders, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089, USA.
 
Title:
Role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in context-dependent motor performance.
 
Source:
European Journal of Neuroscience. 43(7):954-60, 2016 Apr.
 
Abstract:
Context-dependent motor performance is a phenomenon in which people perform better in the environmental context where they originally practised a task. Some animal and computer simulation studies have suggested that context-dependent performance may be associated with neural activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). This study aimed to determine the role of the DLPFC in context-dependent motor performance by perturbing the neural processing of the DLPFC with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in healthy adults. Thirty healthy
adults were recruited into the Control, rTMS DLPFC and rTMS Vertex groups. The participants practised three finger sequences associated with a specific incidental context (a coloured circle and a location on the computer screen). One day following practice, the rTMS groups received 1 Hz rTMS prior to the testing conditions in which the sequence-context associations remained the same as practice (SAME) or changed (SWITCH). All three groups improved significantly over practice on day 1. The second
day testing results showed that the DLPFC group had a significantly lower decrease in motor performance under the SWITCH condition than the Control and Vertex groups. This finding suggests a specific role of the DLPFC in context-dependent motor performance.
 
Copyright:
2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and
John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
 
Publication Type:
Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.

Topic of this Article:

Topics: Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex


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