Neuronavigation-guided Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Aphasia




Curated By TMS Solutions on Sep 5, 2017 5:05:00 PM
Curated By TMS Solutions

TITLE
Neuronavigation-guided Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Aphasia

AUTHORS
Kim WJ; Hahn SJ; Kim WS; Paik NJ. Institution Kim, Woo-Jin. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Inje University of Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital. Hahn, Soo Jung. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Kim, Won-Seok. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Paik, Nam-Jong. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital

ELECTRONIC ADDRESS
njpaik@snu.ac.kr

SOURCE
Journal of Visualized Experiments. (111), 2016 May 06.

ABSTRACT
Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is widely used for several neurological conditions, as it has gained acknowledgement for its potential therapeutic effects. Brain excitability is non-invasively modulated by rTMS, and rTMS to the language areas has proved its potential effects on treatment of aphasia. In our protocol, we aim to artificially induce virtual aphasia in healthy subjects by inhibiting Brodmann area 44 and 45 using neuronavigational TMS (nTMS), and F3 of the International 10-20 EEG system for conventional TMS (cTMS). To measure the degree of aphasia, changes in reaction time to a picture naming task pre- and post-stimulation are measured and compare the delay in reaction time between nTMS and cTMS. Accuracy of the two TMS stimulation methods is compared by averaging the Talairach coordinates of the target and the actual stimulation. Consistency of stimulation is demonstrated by the error range from the target. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate use of nTMS and to describe the benefits and limitations of the nTMS compared to those of cTMS.

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Topics: Stroke/post Stroke, Aphasia


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