Intracortical inhibition in the soleus muscle is reduced during the control of upright standing in both young and old adults.




Curated By TMS Solutions on Jan 17, 2017 8:59:00 AM
Curated By TMS Solutions
Title:
Intracortical inhibition in the soleus muscle is reduced during the control of upright standing in both young and old adults.
 
Authors:
Papegaaij S; Baudry S; Negyesi J; Taube W; Hortobagyi T. Institution Papegaaij, Selma. Center for Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV, Groningen, The Netherlands. selmapapegaaij@gmail.comBaudry, Stephane. Laboratory of Applied Biology, Faculty for Motor Sciences, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CP 640, route de Lennik 808, 1070, Brussels, Belgium. Negyesi, Janos. Center for Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV, Groningen, The Netherlands. Negyesi, Janos. Department of Biomechanics, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Semmelweis University, Alkotas utca 44, Budapest, 1123, Hungary. Taube, Wolfgang. Department of Medicine, University of Fribourg, Ch. du Musee 8, 1700, Fribourg, Switzerland. Hortobagyi, Tibor. Center for Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1,
9713 AV, Groningen, The Netherlands. Hortobagyi, Tibor. Department of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, NE1 8ST, UK.
 
Title:
Intracortical inhibition in the soleus muscle is reduced during the control of upright standing in both young and old adults.
 
Source:
European Journal of Applied Physiology. 116(5):959-67, 2016 May.
Abstract.
 
PURPOSE: In a previous study, we reported that a short-interval
intracortical inhibition (SICI) decreases in old but not in young
adults when standing on foam vs. a rigid surface. Here, we examined if such an age by task difficulty interaction in motor cortical excitability also occurs in easier standing tasks.
 
METHODS: Fourteen young (23 +/- 2.7 years) and fourteen old (65 +/-4.1 years) adults received transcranial magnetic brain stimulation and peripheral nerve stimulation, while they stood with or without support on a force platform.
 
RESULTS: In the soleus, we found that SICI was lower in unsupported (35%inhibition) vs. supported (50 %) standing (p = 0.007) but similar in young vs. old adults (p = 0.591). In the tibialis anterior, SICI was similar between conditions (p = 0.597) but lower in old (52 %) vs. young (72 %) adults (p = 0.030). Age and standing with or without support did not affect the Hoffmann reflex in the soleus.
 
CONCLUSIONS: The current data suggest that the motor cortex is involved in standing control, and that its role becomes more prominent with an increase in task difficulty.
 
Publication Type:
Journal Article. Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.

Topic of this Article:

Topics: Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation


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