Does a single neurostimulation session really affect mood in healthy individuals?




Curated By TMS Solutions on Apr 12, 2017 1:28:00 PM
Curated By TMS Solutions

Authors:

Remue J; Baeken C; De Raedt R. Institution Remue, Jonathan. Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Belgium. Electronic address: Jonathan.Remue@UGent.be . Baeken, Chris. Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Ghent University and University Hospital (UZ Brussel), Department of Psychiatry, Brussels, Belgium. De Raedt, Rudi. Department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Belgium.

Title:

Does a single neurostimulation session really affect mood in healthy individuals? A systematic review. [Review] Source Neuropsychologia. 85:184-98, 2016 May. Abstract Non-invasive neurostimulation or neuromodulation techniques such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) were welcomed as promising tools for investigating cognitive and mood processes in healthy participants as well as in patients suffering from neuropsychiatric conditions. Due to their rather easy application, both modalities have been used to experimentally examine prefrontal cognitive and emotional control. However, it remain s unclear whether a single session of such stimulation may affect the mood of participants in a healthy state. We provide a systematic review of studies reporting the effects of a single session of rTMS or tDCS (...-2014) on self-reported mood in healthy participants. Although early studies reported significant effects on self-reported mood in healthy participants, more recent work investigating mood effects after a single rTMS/tDCS session has failed to find any significant changes in self-reported mood. Therefore it appears that a single session of rTMS/tDCS has no impact on mood in the healthy state.

Authors:

Haddad PM; Talbot PS; Anderson IM; McAllister-Williams RH. Institution Haddad,Peter M. Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PT, UK Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, Cromwell House, Eccles, Salford M30 0GT, UK peter.haddad@manchester.ac.uk . Talbot,Peter S. Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, 27 Palatine Road, Manchester M20 3LJ, UK peter.haddad@manchester.ac.uk . Anderson,Ian M. Neuroscience and Psychiatry Unit, University of Manchester, Stopford Building, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PT, UK. McAllister-Williams,R Hamish. Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Wolfson Research Centre, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PL, UK Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, Regional Affective Disorders Service, Campus for Ageing and Vitality, Westgate Road, Newcastle upon Tyne NE4 5PR, UK. Title Managing inadequate antidepressant response in depressive illness. [Review] Source British Medical Bulletin. 115(1):183-201, 2015 Sep.

Abstract INTRODUCTION OR BACKGROUND:

Depression frequently fails to respond to initial treatment. SOURCES OF DATA: Predominantly meta-analyses and RCTs but supplemented where necessary by additional data and the authors' clinical experience. AREAS OF AGREEMENT: A systematic assessment to identify remedial causes of poor response should be followed by planned sequential treatment trials. Joint decision making by the patient and clinician is essential. Strategies with the strongest support are antidepressant augmentation with lithium or second generation antipsychotics and adding cognitive behavioural treatment. Electroconvulsive therapy is highly effective in resistant depression but there is a high relapse rate when treatment ends.

AREAS OF CONTROVERSY:

Some pharmacological strategies have inconsistent data (e.g. antidepressant combinations, T3 augmentation) or limited preliminary data (e.g. ketamine, antidepressant augmentation with pramipexole). The efficacy of vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is unclear.

GROWING POINTS:

A greater understanding of the causes of depression may assist the development of more effective treatments.

AREAS TIMELY FOR DEVELOPING RESEARCH:

Role of glutamate antagonists and psychological treatments, other than cognitive behavioural therapy, as adjunctive treatments.Copyright © The Author 2015. Published b y Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com . Publication Type Journal Article. Review. Unique Identifier 26487181

Topic of this Article:

Topics: Depression, Neurostimulation


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