Cortical inhibitory and excitatory correlates of depression severity in children and adolescents. Source Journal of Affective Disorders




Curated By TMS Solutions on Aug 17, 2016 3:09:00 PM
Curated By TMS Solutions

Authors:

Lewis CP; Nakonezny PA; Ameis SH; Vande Voort JL; Husain MM; Emslie of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, M N, USA. Husain,Mustafa M. Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Cent er, Dallas, TX, USA. Emslie,Graham J. Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; Department of Pediatrics , University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; Children's Medical Center of Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA. Daskalakis,Zafiris J. Temerty Centre for Therapeutic Brain Int ervention, Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addict ion and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Croarkin,Paul E. Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Divis ion of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Title:

Cortical inhibitory and excitatory correlates of depressi on severity in children and adolescents. Source Journal of Affective Disorders. 190:566-75, 2016 Jan 15.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Neurophysiologic correlates of depression severity potentially have great utility in diagnosis and treatment planning. Transcr anial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measures of cortical inhibition and excitability have shown promise as biomarkers in psychiatry, but no prior work has examined correlates of illness severity in pediatric mood disorders. This study sought to examine the relationship bet ween depression severity and TMS measures of cortical inhibition and excitability in children and adolescents.

METHODS: Twenty-four depressed and 22 healthy control youth underwent TMS testing (cortical silent period [CSP], short-interval int racortical inhibition at 2-ms and 4-ms interstimulus intervals (ISIs) [ SICI- 2, - 4], resting motor threshold [RMT] and intracortical facilitation at 10-, 15-, and 20-ms ISIs [ICF- 10, -15,-20]). Symptom severity was assessed with the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS-A17-SR) and the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised (CDRS- R).

RESULTS: In the overall sample, the following significant negati ve correlations were observed: CDRS-R and CSP (right hemisphere, p=-0.35, p=0.021); QIDS-A17-SR and CSP (left, p=-0.33, p=0.031; righ t, p=-0.42, p=0.004); and CDRS-R and SICI-4 (right, p=-0.30, p=0.042) . Among healthy control participants, additional significant negative cor relations were observed between QIDS-A17-SR and right ICF-10; QIDS-A17-SR and right ICF-15; and QIDS- A1 7-SR and left ICF-20. Among depressed participants, significant negative correlations were observed between QIDS-A17 -SR and bilateral CSP; CDRS-R and bilateral ICF-10; CDRS-R and bilateral I CF-15; QIDS-A17-SR and left ICF-10; and QIDS-A17-SR and bilateral I CF- 15.

LIMITATIONS: Small sample, potential developmental/age- and sex-related effects.

CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary results provide evidence for a relat ionship between depression severity and dysfunction in GABAergic and glutamatergic cortical processes in a pediatric population.

Copyright a9; 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Publication Type Journal Article.

Topic of this Article:

Topics: Depression, Adolescent


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