A critical role of temporoparietal junction in the integrati on of top-down and bottom-up attentional control




Curated By TMS Solutions on Aug 17, 2016 3:23:00 PM
Curated By TMS Solutions

Authors:

Wu Q; Chang CF; Xi S; Huang IW; Liu Z; Juan CH; Wu Y; Fan J. Institution Wu,Qiong. Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijin g, China. Chang,Chi-Fu. Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan. Xi,Sisi. Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijing, C hina. Huang,I-Wen. Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, National C entral University, Jhongli, Taiwan. Liu,Zuxiang. State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. Juan,Chi-Hung. Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Nation al Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan. Wu,Yanhong. Department of Psychology, Peking University, Beijin g, China. Wu,Yanhong. Beijing Key Laboratory of Behavior and Mental Health , Peking University, Beijing, China. Wu,Yanhong. Key Laboratory of Machine Perception (Ministry of Education), Peking University, Beijing, China. Fan,Jin. Department of Psychology, Queens College, The City Univer sity of New York, Queens, New York. Fan,Jin. Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York. Fan,Jin. Department of Neuroscience, Icahn School of Medicine at Moun t Sinai, New York. Fan,Jin. Friedman Brain Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at M ount Sinai, New York.

Title:

A critical role of temporoparietal junction in the integrati on of top-down and bottom-up attentional control.

Source:

Human Brain Mapping. 36(11):4317-33, 2015 Nov.

Abstract:

Information processing can be biased toward behaviorally relev ant and salient stimuli by top-down (goal-directed) and bottom- up (s timulus-driven) attentional control processes respectively. However, the neural basis underlying the integration of these processes is not well understood. We employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) in humans to examin e the brain mechanisms underlying the interaction between these two p rocesses. We manipulated the cognitive load involved in top-down proces sing and stimulus surprise involved in bottom-up processing in a factorial design by combining a majority function task and an oddball paradi gm. We found that high cognitive load and high surprise level were associat ed with prolonged reaction time compared to low cognitive load and low surprise level, with a synergistic interaction effect, which was accompani ed by a greater deactivation of bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ) . In addition, the TPJ displayed negative functional connectivity with rig ht middle occipital gyrus, which is involved in bottom-up processing (modulated by the interaction effect), and the right frontal eye field (FEF), which is involved in top-down control. The enhanced negative functional connectivity between the TPJ and right FEF was accomp anied by a larger behavioral interaction effect across subjects. Application of cathodal tDCS over the right TPJ eliminated the interaction effect . These results suggest that the TPJ plays a critical role in process ing bottom- up information for top-down control of attention.

Copyright © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Publication Type: Journal Article. Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural.

Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.

Topic of this Article:

Topics: Mechanism of Action


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