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Man's Best Friend!

For over 15,000 years, dogs have been our best friends, but could our canine companions also be our best bet for better mental health?  Many experts agree that pets, especially dogs, can put the minds of those with mental illness at ease while helping them manage a more fulfilling life.  If you are living with depression and anxiety, you may be wondering if procuring a pup of your own is the right choice for you.  Here are a few ways dogs can help make your life whole while making life with a mental illness more manageable.

 

Dog Ownership Is a Proven Preventative for Depression… and More

Deciding to include a cuddly canine in your life has a multitude of positive mental and physical health benefits, in addition to the endless supply of snuggles and nose smooches.  Caring for an animal can help give you a sense of purpose and direction in your life.  The need to exercise your new pet can lead to a more active lifestyle and can just get you out of the house.  Aside from these obvious benefits, dogs can serve a much more dedicated purpose by providing emotional support for their owners.  In fact, many people find that emotional-support animals alleviate their depression symptoms.  Need help choosing the right dog to help with your depression or anxiety?  The Daily Positive suggests these breeds as the best at helping their owners through difficult times, but know that you can find comfort in any breed.

 

Finding Dog-Friendly Fun Can Help You Both Find Friends.

Making connections with others is good for you and your dog, and there is no better way to meet new people and pets than visiting a dog park.  Stable social connections can offer real relief of symptoms for those dealing with depression, and dog parks can help you connect with friendly fellow pet owners as a start.  Getting out to a park is a wonderful way for your dog to learn important social skills and etiquette as well, while burning off some of that endless energy. If dog parks aren’t your thing, there are countless ways your new furry friend can help you make new social ties.  At the very least, a dog can help ease some of your anxiety in general and improve your self-esteem, and in turn, lessen your apprehension toward social situations.

 

Can’t Own a Dog of Your Own? Consider Becoming a Dog Walker!

Caring for a canine companion can be a great way to relieve stress and even build friendships, but you don’t have to own a dog to take advantage of all of these health benefits.  Getting a dog can be a major mood enhancer, but it is also a major commitment.  If you have experience with dogs, you can reap many of the benefits, and maybe even make some extra cash, by becoming a dog walker.  Start by walking some of your friends’ dogs to get some practice, and see how those interactions go and then try helping out some neighbors.  Once you have some experience, you can check out helpful sites that can connect you with clients while providing plenty of professional advice to advance your business.  Don’t have time to make canine care a career?  Many local shelters are in need of dog-walking services, so you can get your pettings in there while helping homeless pups.

 

Dogs can be more than just companions to people living with mental illness; they can be a lifeline to a better life.  If you are looking for a way to ease the effects of your depression or anxiety, look no further than your local shelter to find a friendship and freedom that will last a lifetime.

 


 

 About TMS Solutions...

We believe that the road to better mental health and an overall well-being is a very personal journey.  We know that depression can be treated many different ways, from many different angles.  Our goal is to provide tools and information to help those on that path.

To learn more about how TMS Therapy is changing lives and treating depression where antidepressants have failed, click the button below.

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Topics: Mental Health

Michelle Peterson

Written by Michelle Peterson

RecoveryPride.org | michelle@recoverypride.org

  

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